Articles Categorized: History

The Australian Army’s Two ‘Traditional’ Diseases: Gonorrhea and Syphilis — A Military-Medical History During the Twentieth Century

Ian Howie-Willis Abstract Two sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) marched in lockstep with the Australian Army in most, if not all, its overseas campaigns during the twentieth century. Gonorrhoea and syphilis, bacterial infections spread most commonly through sexual intercourse. This article illustrates through reference to the Australian Army’s major overseas deployments; from the Boer War at… Read more »

By Ian Howie-Willis In   Issue Volume 27 Number 1 .

A History of Australian Navy Health Sailor Uniforms and Ranks (Part 3)

Commander Neil Westphalen, Royal Australian Navy Reserve Purpose More than a century after its establishment, many Royal Australian Navy (RAN) uniforms and ranks continue to reflect those used by the (British) Royal Navy (RN). The first of this three-part article described the history of Navy sailor uniforms since 1509,[i] while the second examined the development… Read more »

In   Issue Volume 26 Number 4 .

A History of Australian Navy Health Sailor Uniforms and Ranks (Part 2)

A History of Australian Navy Health Sailor Uniforms and Ranks (Part 2) Commander Neil Westphalen, Royal Australian Navy Reserve  Purpose More than a century after its establishment, many Royal Australian Navy (RAN) uniforms and ranks still reflect those used by the (British) Royal Navy (RN).The first of this three-part article described the history of Navy… Read more »

In   Issue Volume 26 Number 3 .

A History of Australian Navy Health Sailor Uniforms and Ranks (Part 1)

Commander Neil Westphalen, Royal Australian Navy Reserve Purpose Mariners have been identifiable by their clothing for centuries. This reflects their ongoing need for attire that allows free movement for negotiating ladders, doorways and hatches, and performing physically demanding tasks such as hauling lines on cluttered decks and moving heavy weights. In the past, their garments… Read more »

By N. Westphalen and Neil Westphalen In   Issue Volume 26 No.2 .

‘A near-run thing’: The foundation and early years of 1 Malaria Research Laboratory, forerunner of the Australian Army Malaria Institute, 1963–1969 (Part 4 of ‘Pioneers of Australian military malariology’)

Ian Howie-Willis Abstract During the 25 years following World War II, malaria re-emerged as a major threat to Australian military personnel deployed to malarious regions in South-East Asia. By 1952, malariologists in Britain knew that drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax had emerged in Malaya.[i] Successive contingents of Australian soldiers… Read more »

In   Issue Volume 25 No. 2 .

Australian malariology during World War II (Part 3 of ‘Pioneers of Australian military malariology’)

Ian Howie-Willis Abstract This is the third part in a five-part series on the development of Australian military malariology during the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Part 1, which appeared in JMVH 24(1) in January 2016, traced the course taken by Australian malariology between the South African (‘Boer’) War of 1898–1902 and the early 1920s… Read more »

In   Issue Volume 25 No. 2 .

The Army Malaria Institute: Fifty Years of Esteemed “Vampire” Service

J. Pearn Abstract The Golden Jubilee (2016) of the Army Malaria Institute is a significant event in the history not only of the Australian Defence Force, but that of the Australian nation. The Institute’s research – entomological, pharmacological, epidemiological and clinical – has been crucial in the maintenance of optimal healthcare for every operational and humanitarian deployment of… Read more »

In   Issue Volume 25 No. 1 .

Pacific Island Societies Destabilised by Infectious Diseases

Prof G. Dennis Shanks MD1,2,3 Abstract Infectious diseases de-populated many isolated Pacific islands when they were first exposed to global pathogen circulation from the 18th century. In most cases it is difficult to reconstruct mortality risk factors as few literate observers were present when the first epidemics arrived with lethality dropping rapidly during subsequent epidemics…. Read more »

By Dennis Shanks In   Issue Volume 24 No. 4 .

Joint Expeditionary Medical Support in 1914: The US Occupation of Veracruz, Mexico

Sanders Marble Keywords: Military Medicine/history; Military Medicine/organisation & administration; Preventive Medicine/history On Tuesday, 21 April 1914 US sailors and Marines landed at Veracruz, Mexico. There were two days of sporadic fighting by the ‘Bluejackets’ and Marines followed by almost seven months of occupation by Army and Marine forces. The two services would draw limited lessons… Read more »

By Sanders Marble In   Issue Volume 24 No. 3 .

Malariology in Australia between the First and Second World Wars (Part 2 of ‘Pioneers of Australian military malariology’)

Abstract Two ‘push’ factors drove Australian malariological research in the decades before World War II. The first was the nation’s own experience of malaria in its tropical north, where local, usually seasonal, outbreaks of the disease occurred fairly regularly. The second was the Army’s experience of malaria during overseas deployments. During the two inter-war decades, the… Read more »

By Ian Howie-Willis In   Issue Volume 24 No.2 .