Articles Categorized: Articles

LESS THAN LETHAL WEAPONS – Less Lethal Projectiles – An Investigation

DavidAndr “Load up, load up, load up, the rubber bullets” 1 INTRODUCTION The Australian Defence Force is becoming more involved in military non-combatant  control and peacekeeping in areas such as Timor and Bougainville, boarding parties, and the handling of illegal immigrants. This is compounded by Defence Aid to the Civil Power requirements, in events such as… Read more »

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LESS THAN LETHAL WEAPONS – The medical effects of non-lethal weapons -a review1

A.G. Robertson2 ABSTRACT Non-lethal weapons have seen increasing use in the police forces and, more recently, the military forces of various countries around the world. With  increased use in military  operations in areas such  as Panama and Somalia,  there is an increasing  likelihood of military health  service officers coming  in contact with the medical effects of these… Read more »

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MUNITIONS – Thermobaric Munitions and their Medical Effects!

DavidAndr ABSTRACT Thermobaric munitions are those munitions that, by design, produce more heat and  overpressure than conventional explosives  by exploding a vapour in the blast zone. Their main  use initially was in airborne fuel-air  explosive  bombs.  Whilst the United States has concentrated on airborne weapons, Russia has produced thennobaric weapons and warheads, from airborne bombs… Read more »

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MISSILE INJURIES – Over a century of service: the .303 projectile and its wounding capabilities- a historical profile 1

DavidAndr ‘We shot  them under rule .303’1 ABSTRACT The .303 military round has been around for over 100 years and went  from a round nose projectile full metal jacket,  Mks I and  II, to a soft point  Mk II*, the so called dum-dum projectile. The hollow  points, Mks III, IV and  V, followed before going… Read more »

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MISSILE INJURIES – Historical developments in casualty evacuation and triage 1

R. Pearce EARLY TREATMENT With the vastly different technology, and almost primitive surgical skills, available to military commanders at the beginning  of the nineteenth century, their attitude  towards the wounded would appear to be callous. Apart from the commanders themselves, and perhaps some officers of nobility who might depend upon aides or personal servants to recover… Read more »

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MISSILE INJURIES – High velocity missile wounding using military projectiles1

This paper discusses  high velocity missile wounding caused  by military projectiles. For the purpose of this paper, military projectiles considered will be those of eight mm  diameter or less, fired from small arms like rilles, sub-machine guns  and machine guns. High velocity is defined  as speed in excess of 750 m sec1. Corporal Martin Andrew… Read more »

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Understanding weapons effects: A fundamental precept in the professional preparation of military physicians1

AM smith, RF Bellamr Short of participation  in medical support of actual combat, there is no optimal educational  medium  to facilitate competence in the precepts of wartime casualty care. Consequently, there have been periodic calls for “military specific curricula” to help orient medical officers to the differences between the unique science of military medicine, and… Read more »

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Does attending the same Doctor improve outcome in Chronic Disease

Geoffrey Quail   MBBS, DDS(hons), M Med, MDSc, DTM&H, FRACGP, FRACDS, FACTM”. ABSTRACT The value of attending  the same medical practitioner in achieving  optimal  patient care. compliance with treatment and a favourable  outcome  is generally accepted and  there a many publications  to support this concept.  Most  however concerns  patient satisfaction and there is little  written of an… Read more »

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Employment in the Australian Army after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction – A Pilot Study of 3 Year Postoperative Outcomes

CAPT Peter Weinrauch M.B.B.S. (Qld)“ COL Peter Sharwood RFD. M.B.B.S.(Qld), F.R.A.C.S. F.A.Orth.A.b ABSTRACT This study examines the military employment of soldiers in the Australian Regular Army 3 years after Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Patients undertaking ACL reconstruction were more likely to be assessed as medically unfit for military service compared to a control group undertaking… Read more »

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Nutritional Determinants of Bone Health: Implications for the Australian Defence Force

Key Words: bone h ealth. nutrition. military. training. calcium. vitamin  D Christine Booth PHD & Julia carins ABSTRACT The imp01tance of dietary  calcium  in the prevention of poor bone health and osteoporosis in later life is well recognised and two National Diet Surveys have highlighted the problem of many Australian women eating insufficient calcium. Surveys  of… Read more »

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